Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood Band

Fred Rogers takes us backstage in his neighborhood to introduce the three-piece who provided the soundtrack to Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood

The legacy of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood was never in question, but an overlooked aspect of the show is the three-piece house band, fronted with John Costa’s colorful piano, Carl McVickie Jr on bass, and drummer Bobby Rawsthorne, who provided the show’s recognizable soundtrack.

A show that provided many firsts growing up, Fred Rogers takes us backstage to introduce what was for many, their first favorite jazz group.

Breaking Bad Writers on NPR's Fresh Air

Peter Gould and Thomas Schnauz discuss writing for Breaking Bad with NPR’s Terry Gross on this episode of Fresh Air (Listen / Read Transcripts)

Terry Gross speaks with Peter Gould and Thomas Schnauz, two writers from AMC’s Breaking Bad in a recent episode of Fresh Air.

Listen to the complete interview here, or read the transcript [via NPR]

PG: I think ultimately, we talked about the morality of the show a lot while we were working on it, and to me, the actions he has taken are beyond redemption, so there might be some enlightening or understanding that he has, but I would distinguish between self-understanding and any kind of redemption.

TS: The pizza on the roof was unforgivable

Microsoft's Fall From Grace via The Wire

Further evidence that David Simon’s legendary tv drama The Wire is about so much more than inner-city drug conspiracies, Slate has recently published this article outlining the decline of the Microsoft empire in the context of The Barksdale Organization.

Further evidence that David Simon’s legendary tv drama The Wire is about so much more than inner-city drug conspiracies, Slate has recently published this article outlining the decline of the Microsoft empire in the context of The Barksdale Organization.

Continue reading “Microsoft's Fall From Grace via The Wire”

The Best Wrestling Article I Can Remember

Cena’s well-anticipated victory was one of the most anti-climactic passing of the torches I’ve ever witnessed, I had a difficult time figuring out why, perhaps from lack of paying attention to wrestling for the past decade, but the crew over at Grantland presents this article outlining the challenges the WWE faces with Cena quite eloquently.

No qualms over the fact I was a loyal follower of WWF/WWE during the Attitude Era of 1998-2001, I suppose it is out of sheer inertia that I ended up watching Wrestlemania 29 this past Sunday. Having not kept up with professional wrestling the past few years I ended up pulling for who I remembered, Triple H (now aged 43), and obviously The Rock (age 40).

All details aside, John Cena had a well-anticipated victory was one of the most anti-climactic passing of the torches I’ve ever saw, I had a difficult time figuring out why, perhaps from lack of paying attention to wrestling for the past decade, but the crew over at Grantland presents this article outlining the challenges the WWE faces with Cena quite eloquently.

When WWE pretends its narrative is working when it’s clearly not, its dishonesty affects how people view its product. If we can’t even be sure that heroes are heroes anymore, then what’s the point of cheering? [*]

John Cena, WrestleMania 29, and WWE’s Perception Problem [via Grantland]

'Twin Peaks' Theme

Angelo Badalamenti uses his Fender Rhodes to explain the creative process behind creating the theme music for David Lynch’s “Twin Peaks’ tv-series.

A nice short video from composer Angelo Badalamenti, describing the creative process between himself and David Lynch in composing “Falling,” the instantly recognizable theme from Twin Peaks.

Kode9 & Burial (2007)

Flashback to a snippet of an old but wonderful interview between Hyperdub founder Kode9, and Burial, regarding his then-forthcoming release ‘Untrue’

To read the whole interview, click here

9: Why didn’t you use a sequencer on the album?

Burial: I tried. I did one tune before. . .Unite. With someone showing me how to use it, and it worked out nice, but in the end I wasn’t ready and I wanted to do another record without a sequencer again.

9: You like that ramshackle thing, don’t you.

Burial: Yeah, I admire people who understand complicated programs or whatever. But I’m not that into tunes that are so sequenced that all you can hear is the perfect grid, even on the echoes. With those kind of tunes, sometimes I just hear Tetris music, i always know where i am in the tune so i cant get lost in it, no rough edges in some tunes even when they try hard to sound rough. I want to learn one day how to make tunes properly, but I wanted to do a tribute to my rubbish, dying computer. It starts smoking sometimes and the screen flickers like a strobelight, it mashes your eyes. The tunes are made where they’re made, somewhere in my building, the roof or wherever, but not in some airtight studio. Loads of the album was made with the TV on. I wish i could make technical proper music one day but people who want technical music maybe won’t like my new tunes but its not for them.