NSA Explores Infecting You With Malware

Recent documents outlining the NSA and GCHQ teaming up to automate malware installation across millions of private citizen’s machine in an effort named PROJECT TURBINE

A post this morning on The Intercept details the NSA‘s plans to infect ‘millions‘ of private citizen’s computers with malware, as well as plans to automate large portions of the process to “reduce the level of human oversight in the process.” We recently explored the NSA and GCHQ joining forces to conduct mass surveillance without due process across Yahoo Messenger, and today’s report from The Intercept shows the bond between these two agencies is strong as ever.

UPDATE: The Intercept provides more information on  QUANTUMHAND‘s functionality allowing the NSA to spoof Facebook to spy on citizens

How the NSA Plans to Infect ‘Millions’ of Computers with Malware [via The Intercept]

In some cases the NSA has masqueraded as a fake Facebook server, using the social media site as a launching pad to infect a target’s computer and exfiltrate files from a hard drive. In others, it has sent out spam emails laced with the malware, which can be tailored to covertly record audio from a computer’s microphone and take snapshots with its webcam. The hacking systems have also enabled the NSA to launch cyberattacks by corrupting and disrupting file downloads or denying access to websites.

"Undesirable Nudity"

British GCHQ and American NSA have been watching and collecting private text and video conversations on Yahoo Messenger

undesirable nudityThe NSA and the British GCHQ have been intercepting Yahoo Messenger video content shared on ostensibly private webcam conversations. If that’s not embarrassing enough, they’ve deemed the majority of users “undesirable.

UPDATE: The NSA and GCHQ continue to collaborate working on automating malware installations on private citizen’s computers.

GCHQ does not have the technical means to make sure no images of UK or US citizens are collected and stored by the system, and there are no restrictions under UK law to prevent Americans’ images being accessed by British analysts without an individual warrant.

Read the entire article on The Guardian