Jack Sparrow Speaks

Jack Sparrow (Author / R. Wild) shares some valuable insights with GetDarker in this recent interview

Some good words from Jack Sparrow / R Wild / 1/2 of Author, one of my favorite producers. One of the more well-spoken, and friendlier artists I’ve interacted with as a result of working on this site. Also, he comes correct with the book recommendations so much respect for him in that regard too.

It’s a therapy for me. It literally is therapy. If I didn’t do music there are parts of me that I couldn’t get out; in conversation, emotionally. It’s not a case of “I’m gonna do this tune and this promo and rah rah rah.” I write tunes because I need to.

Excellent anecdotes and observations on the early dubstep scene, his emergence as an artist, and ironically some allusions to the topics brought up in the musical ability vs neighborhoods of UK post from yesterday.

GetDarker Meets Jack Sparrow

Ableton Interviews Archie Pelago

Ableton interviews NYC musical trio Archie Pelago about their use of Ableton Live and the Ableton Push controller.

About time. If anybody needs to be speaking to the masses about how well Ableton Live works with live instrumentation it’s these guys, not someone getting paid too much to click play over and over on other people’s songs they spent an afternoon drawing grids for. Gerhard Behles and Robert Henke would be proud.

Archie Pelago: Creative Collective [via Ableton]

This used to be more rigid than it is today: we would first identify the most important parts of tracks – the beats, bass and drums…  Since we’ve integrated Push into our setup, our [live interpretations] are neither as complex nor as static as they used to be. We now go much deeper into the arrangement and export smaller particles that Hirshi can trigger in real time with Push. We’re much freer on stage now than we used to be because we can change the flow and the structure of any song at any time.

 

Borges and Buckley

Watch Jorge Luis Borges interviewed by William F. Buckley Jr. on this 1977 broadcast of Firing Line

We contrasted English and Spanish, and why he considered English a far finer language than Spanish—during which, I might add, he did a little cadenza in German, which he taught himself so he could read Schopenhauer in the original. Then I asked him if the fact that the Spanish language is less resourceful than the English language necessarily makes it less complete as poetry. He replied, “No. I think that when poetry is achieved, it can be achieved in any language. It’s more that a fine Spanish verse that could hardly be translated to another language would turn to something else. But when beauty happens, well, there it is.”

[*]

Breaking Bad Writers on NPR's Fresh Air

Peter Gould and Thomas Schnauz discuss writing for Breaking Bad with NPR’s Terry Gross on this episode of Fresh Air (Listen / Read Transcripts)

Terry Gross speaks with Peter Gould and Thomas Schnauz, two writers from AMC’s Breaking Bad in a recent episode of Fresh Air.

Listen to the complete interview here, or read the transcript [via NPR]

PG: I think ultimately, we talked about the morality of the show a lot while we were working on it, and to me, the actions he has taken are beyond redemption, so there might be some enlightening or understanding that he has, but I would distinguish between self-understanding and any kind of redemption.

TS: The pizza on the roof was unforgivable

Mario Batali and Jim Harrison

Mario Batali interviews author Jim Harrison in this piece published in Food & Wine

This interview on Food & Wine between Mario Batali and Jim Harrison is full of gold covering cuisine, criticism, and more.

I have included a short excerpt below but recommend the whole thing – it’s quick.

The Hungry Crowd: Mario Batali Interviews Jim Harrison [via Food & Wine]

B: Do reviews improve anything?

H: I think a couple of times in my career they’ve been helpful. But restaurant critics are a little more honest, because they review the food they ate. Sometimes literary critics review the book they wanted you to write, not the book you wrote, and that’s very irksome. [*]

Mike Tyson Interviewed on NPR

Tyson is an individual who has experienced both extremes of the human emotional spectrum, and the way in which he speaks gives an air of humility and sincerity that is unmatched by many people who share about their successes.

This one is well worth your time, listen, enjoy, share.

“Shame is an awesome motivator.”

A truly interesting interview aired yesterday on KQED’s Forum broadcast, as they hosted legendary boxer Mike Tyson. Known not just for his boxing prowess, but also for numerous legal troubles, and as one of the English language’s most unique orators, this interview is nothing short of amazing.

Stream / Download Mike Tyson on KQED Forum, or sample some highlights from the segment below.

Tyson is an individual who has experienced both extremes of the human emotional spectrum, and the way in which he speaks gives an air of humility and sincerity that is unmatched by many people who share about their successes.

This one is well worth your time, listen, enjoy, share.

Continue reading “Mike Tyson Interviewed on NPR”

RA.Exchage 114 – Scuba

Resident Advisor sits down with HotFlush honcho Paul Rose (Scuba/SCB) for their latest installment of their Exchange series.

Exchange, focuses on the words of artists profiled on Resident Advisor, putting the music on the back-burner momentarily. With a reputation as one of the more diverse, and well-spoken electronic music stalwarts, this promises to be an interesting listen at the very least.

RA.Exchange 114 – Scuba

Ignorance: How It Drives

Answers have become so easy and so readily available that I think we now have too much emphasis on answers and not enough on questions

Continuing the theme diversifying content, we are sharing a link from NPR‘s Talk of the Nation. Recently, on Science Friday, Ira Flatow spoke with neuroscientist Stuart Firestein on the latter’s recent publication Ignorance: How It Drives Science Forward, outlining an important realization not unique to the scientific community.

“…answers have become so easy and so readily available that I think we now have too much emphasis on answers and not enough on questions” [*]

For more from icnt.mx, including the full interview with Firestein, continue beneath the fold.

Continue reading “Ignorance: How It Drives”