Connecting Wealth and Musical Ability

The Guardian shares research showing the connection between wealth, neighborhood, and measurable musical talent.

The Guardian recently posted an article detailing the connections between British postal codes and musical ability. Everybody slow down, Bow E3 is a ‘hype ting’ but there is empirical data and some interesting takeaways. Clearly there are exception to every rule but on this site we are lovers on both music and data and statistics so this seemed in the vein of our typical reporting.

Interestingly, it was the categories that seemed more objective such as ‘melodic memory’ and ‘beat perception’ that showed the strongest statistical correlation with wealth.

The article on The Guardian contains a table of melodic memory as it correlates to geographic region, but the short answer is we need to be hearing grime from Hastings and West Somerset. By the way, yes Hackney did make the top 10 list.

Key Findings

  • People had better “musical sophistication” in periods of their lives with more flexibility, such as at school, university or when they are self-employed.
  • Late adolescence is where a peak stage is reached for sophisticated engagement with music.
  • Gender and ethnicity explained “very little” when it came to musical ability.
  • People working in music, media and education keep their links to music throughout their life.

Benn Jordan on Spotify

Benn Jordan (aka The Flashbulb) takes a smart and objective examination at the internet and musician’s obsession with ‘Spotify Hatred’

Benn Jordan (aka The Flashbulb) blogged an informative, accurate, and interesting piece approaching everybody’s hatred of Spotify with a bit of common-sense. Read the entirety of I Can’t Believe It’s Getting Better on Benn’s blog,

If you are looking for more interesting things to read on this topic, now is a good time to revisit Frank Zappa‘s writings from 1983 where he basically predicts the future of digital music purchasing and streaming, “A Proposal For A System To Replace Ordinary Record Merchandising.” in addition to our previous posting on Why Music Shouldn’t Be Free

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Microsoft's Fall From Grace via The Wire

Further evidence that David Simon’s legendary tv drama The Wire is about so much more than inner-city drug conspiracies, Slate has recently published this article outlining the decline of the Microsoft empire in the context of The Barksdale Organization.

Further evidence that David Simon’s legendary tv drama The Wire is about so much more than inner-city drug conspiracies, Slate has recently published this article outlining the decline of the Microsoft empire in the context of The Barksdale Organization.

Continue reading “Microsoft's Fall From Grace via The Wire”

Zappa Trust Opens Roxy Recordings and Licensing

To raise money for the release of the video portions of the 1974 Roxy & Elsewhere anthology, the Zappa Family Trust opens licensing to two 1973 recordings

Even dead, Frank Zappa continues to push the boundaries of music marketing and sales, making the master recordings of two 1973 Roxy recordings available for purchase and even opening up the licensing of the recordings to allow for mass duplication and reselling.

For a $1,000 licensing fee, fans can own a master duplication copy of the recording, which they can copy and sell for whatever price they’d like, with $1.20 per-CD mechanical royalty to be paid to Zappa Records.

The proceeds from licensing these recordings will go towards the restoration and release of the video portion of Roxy & Elsewherewhich has been a long time coming for Zappa fans.

Frank Zappa Fans Offered Unique Access To Unreleased Music [via Rolling Stone]

 

 

11 Amazing Facts About The McRib

Yahoo Finance takes a look at the nutritional and economic impact of McDonald’s famed McRib sandwiches

According to an article from Chicago magazine, which cites a 1995 article by Mandigo, “restructured meat product” contains a mixture of tripe, heart, and scalded stomach, which is then mixed with salt and water to extract proteins from the muscle. The proteins bind all the pork trimmings together so that it can be re-molded into any specific shape — in this case, a fake slab of ribs.

Makes me want to eat pho! Read the entire McRib article on Yahoo

Curiosity Spending Compared

With NASA Mars Science LaboratoryNASA Curiosity‘s Curiosity rover riding around and hopefully getting it on the surface of Mars, it felt right to take a look at how NASA ‘spends it.’ Given the awareness Barack Obama’s budget cuts for NASA raised earlier in the year, and the looming election I felt this would be interesting as well as salient. Despite Obama supporting these cuts in the past, he wasted no time changing his stance while public support for NASA reached an all-time high last evening.

I have seen a number of articles trying to draw a number of these comparisons separately, for ease and posterity’s sake I have done my best to compile a number of them here.

NASA Curiosity Mission: US$2.5 bil [source]
Iraq War: US$805 bil [source]
Afghanistan War: US$554 bil
[source]
US Libyan Intervention: US$896 mil (~$9mil per day) [source]
US War On Drugs (Jan 2012 – Aug 2012): US$24 bil (~$500 per second) [source]
Obama 2008 Presidential Campaign: US$760 mil [source]
McCain 2008 Presidential Campaign: US$358 mil [source]

Note: I am not against government spending in it’s entirety, I’m fine with paying for something as long as we receive some measurable benefit from our spending.

Corporate Rave Culture

A few things I found missing from the New York Times piece, I feel the writers failed to mention the amount of good corporate money fostering valuable contributions to the music industry.

New York Times goes in-depth on the rise of corporate funding for underground electronic dance music. Fresh off the heels of Ultra Music Festival last month, and the sentiments from PercussionLab last week, and a related post today, sharing this article felt appropriate.

The big dance festivals have built themselves into valuable brands, able to sell tickets on their name alone and the immersive audio-visual spectacle they present. One big company could bring together a handful of promoters and find economies of scale.[*]

A few things I found missing from the New York Times piece, I feel the writers failed to mention the amount of good corporate money fostering valuable contributions to the music industry.

Continue reading “Corporate Rave Culture”